Scientists are turning carbon dioxide into a liquid that powers fuel-cells

Scientists are turning carbon dioxide into a liquid that powers fuel-cells

While it’s good that we’re finding ways to capture carbon dioxide from the atmosphere, it’s even better that we’re finding ways to turn all that CO2 into something good for the planet. Recently, scientists at Rice University have devised an environmentally friendly way to take carbon dioxide and turn it into liquid fuel.

The device uses a catalytic reactor to transform the greenhouse gas into formic acid, which can be found in bee and ant venom. Formic acid can be used as a fuel-cell fuel that, when burned, will emit carbon dioxide that can be recaptured and used to produce more fuel, essentially creating a closed loop. On top of that, the pungent, colorless liquid has antibacterial qualities and can be used as a preservative.

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